miércoles, 14 de febrero de 2018

The sleepwalkers

The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914 by Christopher Clark
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Since I was a child, I have been puzzled about how the First World War started. When you study the Second World War, you have a feeling of the inevitability of the conflict: A megalomaniac fool invading one country after another until the other big powers get fed up and declared the war. On the contrary, in the first reading the chronicles of the begining of the Great War you see the killing of the heir of a decaying empire at the hands of a nacionalist terrorist group as the flame that ignited the clash. Everytime I have spoken with a friend about the comparison of the outbreak of the starting of the two major disputes of the human beings history, I have met with a reflexion of my own perplexity.

With the rationale above, it is easy to understand why the first time I read of the existence of "The sleepwalkers" I knew that I would read that book. The essay looked as the key to the explanation I was looking for since my childhood, the link bewtween the killing in Sarajevo and the explosion of a war that ending with the dead of 30 million of people. Once I have finished it, I am not disappointed in ny manner. At last, I have worked out the debt of knowledge on the matter with myself.

The pages of "The sleepwalker" disentangle the genesis of the war. On one hand, there was a growing rivalry for the dominance of the Balkans between a rising country and a decaying one, respectively, Serbia and Austria-Hungary. On the other hand, both of these countries was the vortex of a complex alliance scheme. The inevitable conflict between Serbia and Austria drawn the rest of the European continent to war. The killing in Sarajevo was an excuse, but it could be another one.

However, it was not so simple as it was described above. Reading the pages of "The Sleepwalkers" you have the feeling that the war could have been avoided. The unthinkable of the war was it the end the reason for its declaration. Every power acted as if the other side was going to act in a wiser manner and would take the cautious decision on spite of its provocation. It was this way of thinking the final rationale for the conflict.

But the book is more than an excellent history book. "The sleepwalkers" it is also a background for thinking in our current crisis in many areas, both in the international and national arena. The pages of the book give us many reasons for demanding a more concious behaviour of our leaders, asking them for being something more than sleepwalkers dragged by the events.

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